Chick’nCone serves a new take on chicken and waffles – mySA

Maybe you’ve heard of Chick’nCone, the national chain that dared to ask the question at its inception: what if chicken and waffles, the classic southern brunch item, could be portable and sort of like ice cream?

As of Sunday, September 18, there is now a Chick’nCone coop operating in San Antonio. Eye catching and gimmicky, the linchpin of the Chick’nCone operation is a fresh house-made waffle cone stuffed with fried chicken and smothered in a sauce of your choice.

The local shop has been nearly a year in the making, the opening was announced in October of last year. You can find the handheld chicken at the mouth of Olmos Park, nestled near Volare Italian Restaurant, a Tuesday Morning, and the original Bexar Kolaches.

While stopping in to try it for myself on Tuesday, September 20, I determined that biting into a Chick’nCone like it’s two scoops of Ben and Jerry’s Cherry Garcia feels like a somewhat silly act that even becomes dangerous when you’re wearing a white T-shirt. It’s my belief that the best way to actually eat it is by using a fork, allowing the cone to act as a vehicle for the small and succulent bites of meat. 

If you want to enjoy the ice cream parlor trick of enjoying your Chick’nCone like a dessert, then I encourage you to do so. I personally don’t feel compelled to post a novelty Chick’nCone on my Instagram, but I get the appeal. 

The Chick'nCone. 

The Chick’nCone. 

Camille Sauers/MySA

I will say, once alienated from the simulation of enjoying an ice cream cone, the experience becomes a different one entirely. The waffle cone acts as a unique  bowl. Using one food as a container for another feels sort of melancholic, fun, and old timey, like in The Bell Jar when Esther Greenwood and her house mates dine on “avocado pear halves stuffed with crabmeat and mayonnaise.”

Granted, they got food poisoning after they ate those things. But I can say with a smile that this did not happen to me after eating a food within a food at Chick’nCone. 

Instead, I felt pretty good. The chicken, which I decided to have drenched in a spicy ranch variant, known around the shop as “Kick’n Ranch,” was flavorful and satiating. Tearing off a few pieces of the cone throughout my meal proved to be an admittedly complimentary combo. 

If you’re not feeling a Chick’nCone, which costs $12.79, the restaurant’s fundamental menu offerings run the gamut of other fried chicken based fare. You can order the Chick ‘n Sandwich (available for $10.99) or you can go down the Chick’n tender path. 

Something interesting about the chain is that you can buy one single chicken tender for $2.49 if you’re not that hungry but “just need a little something for not a lot of cash.”

I almost always want something like this and will probably be ordering one single chicken tender in the future. Maybe $2.49 still feels like a lot of money for one single chicken tender, but from what I can tell, the strips of meat do appear to be pretty substantial. 

You can also buy a basket of four tenders for $12.79, or a basket of three for $12.49. The restaurant also serves a variety of milkshakes and sides, including fries, macaroni, and Cajun-spiced corn. 

Something to keep in mind: The San Antonio Chick’nCone, found off Hildebrand and McCullough, does have a fairly small dining area, with only a few tang-orange colored tables. I found a seat with no real effort, but after I arrived, a crowd from the nearby yoga studio filed in, and it began to feel decently crowded. 

If you’re not looking to feel cooped up, maybe take the bird to-go. 

The Chick’nCone website still suggests the store is in development. However, the shop’s Instagram confirmed its official opening.

The chicken shop is now operating Monday through Saturday from noon to 8 p.m. The Pennsylvania-based fast-casual franchise was founded in 2014.

Find it: 223 E Hildebrand Ave Suite 101B, San Antonio, TX 78212

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