Historic hospital building cleared, condemned after massive earthquake

The Robert B. Green historical building, named for former Bexar County Judge Robert B. Green, was designed by architect Atlee B. Ayres and opened in 1917. According to University Health, “It was lauded as ‘one of the best and most modern institutions of its kind in the Southwest.'”

According to the hospital, administrative services housed in the historical building have been moved to the health systems other locations in the city.

“This building has been closed off and a safety zone has been established around it until we have definitive plans on how to proceed. The vast majority of the building’s clinical services were moved in 2013 to the newer Robert B. Green clinical building, which appears to be unaffected by the temblor. However, engineers are examining all the buildings on the campus,” the release stated.

A historic building on University Health's Robert B. Green campus was condemned and cleared after a 5.3 magnitude earthquake exacerbated existing issues.

A historic building on University Health’s Robert B. Green campus was condemned and cleared after a 5.3 magnitude earthquake exacerbated existing issues.

Warren Brown/MySA

A historic building on University Health's Robert B. Green campus was condemned and cleared after a 5.3 magnitude earthquake exacerbated existing issues.

A historic building on University Health’s Robert B. Green campus was condemned and cleared after a 5.3 magnitude earthquake exacerbated existing issues.

Warren Brown/MySA

The building has a storied history, according to University Health, and was even added to the state registry of historic buildings in October 2020.

“The hospital was the first center of our long partnership with the U.S. military, providing examinations for service members, and was the site for training multiple generations of nurses and doctors. Many San Antonians received care there during the influenza pandemic of 1918, and many more were treated there during the 1940s and 1950s polio epidemic that terrified parents and shut down San Antonio schools.” 

A historic building on University Health's Robert B. Green campus was condemned and cleared after a 5.3 magnitude earthquake exacerbated existing issues.

A historic building on University Health’s Robert B. Green campus was condemned and cleared after a 5.3 magnitude earthquake exacerbated existing issues.

Warren Brown/MySA

A historic building on University Health's Robert B. Green campus was condemned and cleared after a 5.3 magnitude earthquake exacerbated existing issues.

A historic building on University Health’s Robert B. Green campus was condemned and cleared after a 5.3 magnitude earthquake exacerbated existing issues.

Warren Brown/MySA

The USGS reported the massive earthquake struck around 3:32 p.m. near Reeves and Culverson County Line in West Texas at 3:32 p.m., which is about 350 miles northwest of San Antonio. The magnitude 5.3 quake appears to be one of the largest in Texas history. The largest known earthquake to ever hit Texas was a 6.0 magnitude quake in the town of Valentine, near Marfa, in 1931. 

TexNet, the Texas state earthquake monitoring network, stated the following about the seismic activity:

“We are still investigating the data associated with these seismic events,” said Scott W. Tinker, the State Geologist of Texas, and the director of the Bureau of Economic Geology. “Our first concern, of course, is for any people who might have been affected by these earthquakes. The professional scientists on the TexNet team, led by Alexandros Savvaidis, are working diligently to analyze the data that we have received from the TexNet network of monitoring stations.”

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