Monkeypox tracker: Bexar County cases up to 50 | Live updates

While the risk to the general public is currently low, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has put people on edge when it comes to unfamiliar viruses and diseases.

SAN ANTONIO — The San Antonio community and surrounding areas are concerned by the growing number of monkeypox cases reported in Bexar County.

While the risk to the general public is currently low, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has understandably put people on edge when it comes to unfamiliar viruses and diseases. Metro Health says everyone should be aware of the symptoms of monkeypox and seek medical attention if they experience them. 

Below are the latest updates on monkeypox in Bexar County and you can track cases directly through Metro Health’s dashboard here.

Wednesday, Sept. 14

Bexar County has now recorded 50 confirmed monkeypox cases, after three more diagnoses were reported Wednesday. 

Tuesday, Sept. 13

Two more monkeypox cases today, raising the local total to 47. 

Monday, Sept. 12

The week begins with Bexar County health officials reporting a new monkeypox case. The total is now at 45. 

Friday, Sept. 9

Four more monkeypox cases reported in Bexar County, bringing the local total to 44. 

Thursday, Sept. 8

Three more monkeypox cases are reported by Bexar County health authorities, bringing the community’s total to 40. 

Tuesday, Sept. 6

Five more monkeypox cases are reported by local health authorities after the Labor Day weekend, bringing Bexar County’s total to 37. 

Thursday, Sept. 1

For the fourth time this week, health officials say they are new monkeypox cases. Two more have been diagnosed, bringing Bexar County’s total to 32. 

Wednesday, August 31

Another lone case is reported by health authorities, bringing Bexar County’s total to 30. 

Tuesday, August 30

For the second day in a row, Bexar County health officials report two new monkeypox cases. The total is now up to 29. 

Meanwhile, officials in the Houston area confirmed that a person recently diagnosed with monkeypox has died. An investigation has begun into how big a role the disease played in their death. 

Back in San Antonio, Metro Health continues urging residents to get tested if they’re experiencing symptoms, as well as information on vaccine eligibility, for which there are still limited doses. See the full statement below:

“Metro Health continues to closely monitor monkeypox cases in Bexar County and as of today there are 29 reported cases. Metro Health urges people to get tested if they are exposed to monkeypox or have symptoms consistent with the disease. Monkeypox is a preventable disease that spreads through close contact with an infected person. There are things everyone should do to help prevent the spread of monkeypox:

  • Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact with someone with a new, unexplained rash.
  • Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact in large crowds where people are wearing minimal clothing, such as nightclubs, festivals, raves, saunas, and bathhouses.
  • Do not share cups, utensils, bedding or towels with someone who is sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.

“Metro Health provides vaccine for those who have been exposed. For more information on Monkeypox and vaccine eligibility criteria, please visit sanantonio.gov/HEALTH.”

Monday, August 29

Health officials report two new monkeypox diagnoses, bringing the Bexar County total to 27. 

Thursday, August 25

Another monkeypox cases was reported in Bexar County, bringing the total to 25. 

Monday, August 22

Four more monkeypox cases have been reported in the last week by county health officials, bringing the total to 24. 

Monday, August 15

Bexar County health officials report three more monkeypox cases, bringing the county’s total to 20. 

Thursday, August 11

Bexar County authorities report a lone additional monkeypox case, bringing the total to 17. 

Friday, August 5

Bexar County health authorities reports another three monkeypox cases, bringing the total to 16. 

Thursday, August 4

The U.S. declared the monkeypox outbreak a public health emergency, bolstering the national response and freeing up additional resources to fight the virus. 

Tuesday, August 2

San Antonio Metro Health has received 1,000 doses of the monkeypox vaccien from the Texas Department of State Health Services.

The vaccine JYNNEOSTM is enough to fully vaccinate 500 people. A full dose include two shots, officials said.

Friday, July 29

The monkeypox case total in Bexar County nearly doubled this week, with 13 cases now reported in the San Antonio area entering the weekend. 

Friday, July 22

Two new cases were reported in Bexar County Friday. That brings the total number of cases to seven.

Monday, July 18

Metro Health reported five total cases in Bexar County on Monday.

Friday, July 15

Metro Health reported three total cases in Bexar County and announced the addition of an online dashboard to track cases.

Thursday, July 14

Bexar County confirmed its first two cases of monkeypox. KENS 5 spoke with Dr. Anita Kurian, the Assistant Director of San Antonio Metro Health Communicable Disease Division, about the risks and how monkeypox is transmitted. Here is some of what she said.

Symptoms of monkeypox can include:   

  • Fever   
  • Headache   
  • Muscle aches and backache   
  • Swollen lymph nodes   
  • Chills   
  • Exhaustion   
  • A rash that can look like pimples or blisters that appears on the face, inside the mouth and on other parts of the body, like the hands/palms, feet, chest or genitals. The rash goes through different stages before healing completely.

To prevent the spread of monkeypox, individuals can:

  • Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact in large crowds where people are wearing minimal clothing (such as nightclubs, festivals, raves, saunas, and bathhouses).
  • Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact with someone with a new, unexplained rash.
  • If you were exposed to monkeypox or have symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes and a new, unexplained rash, contact your healthcare provider as soon as possible. Healthcare providers can provide testing and care for people with monkeypox.
  • If sick with monkeypox, isolate at home until the rash has fully resolved, the scabs have fallen off, and a fresh layer of intact skin has formed. Monkeypox is usually a self-limiting infection that does not require hospitalization.

More information about how to prevent infection can be found on the CDC Monkeypox website.

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